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Hebrew
 

Hebrew

Students can obtain a:

Undergraduate students can also minor in Near Eastern Languages or Near Eastern Studies.

Students majoring in other fields but wishing to studty either Hebrew as a language or a culture can take the following Hebrew Language and Culture coruses.

 

Language Courses

HEB 1010 and 1020: Elementary Hebrew I and II (4 credits)
The objectives of these classes is to study the Hebrew Language: phonology, grammatical structures, and syntax. These studies enable the students to read, write, and speak Hebrew. To facilitate the speaking skills, we use Hebrew as much as possible in class, and the students are encouraged to visit the language laboratory using tapes and computer programs. These teachings will give the students a solid foundation for further studies in the language. The students are eventually able to read and comprehend both a modern and biblical texts; write in print and cursive, and converse in Hebrew. Further language studies are encouraged after the students complete the Hebrew program at Wayne . The class fulfills a language requirement, and counts towards a minor in Hebrew or a major in Near Eastern Studies with a concentration in Hebrew.

HEB 2010: Intermediate Hebrew I (4 credits)
Hebrew 2010 is an intermediate course with the objective to use and implement most of the grammatical principles we have learned in Hebrew 1010 and 1020. There is an extensive use of vocabulary; a review of the most useful Hebrew verbs, common declensions of prepositions, and readings in intermediate and more advanced texts which deal with the Israeli climate, geography, society and culture. Additional texts are provided for advanced students. There is also an emphasis on speaking, lab visits, and student presentations on current events taken from Hebrew journals and newspapers. Occasionally, we incorporate poetry readings in bi-lingual editions for the purposes of listening to the sonority of the Hebrew language, and vocabulary enrichments.

The main purpose of this class is to encourage students to use the language at all levels: reading, writing, and conversation. At the completion of this class, students are prepared to continue their studies in Advanced Hebrew, (Modern and Biblical) and in the reading of Hebrew literature. Hebrew 2010 completes the sequences of the language course that fulfill Foreign Language General Education requirements. It also counts as a Foreign Culture, and can further be used toward a Hebrew minor or a major in Near Eastern studies with a concentration in Hebrew.

Hebrew 2020: Intermediate Hebrew II (4 credits)
This course is an intermediate/advanced class with the objective to use and implement the grammatical principles learned in Hebrew 1010, 1020, and 2010. There is an extensive use of the vocabulary; a review of the most useful verbs, common declensions of prepositions, and reading intermediate/advanced texts which deals with Israeli/Jewish cultures, such as artists, poets, novelists and dramatists; national heroes, sports people, and holocaust survivors. Additional texts are provided for advanced students. There is also an emphasis on speaking, lab visits, and students' presentations on current events. Occasionally, we incorporate poetry readings in bilingual editions for the purpose of listening to the sonority of the Hebrew language, and its rich vocabulary. 

The main purpose of this class is to encourage students to use the language on all levels: reading, writing, and conversation. At the completion of this class, students are prepared to continue their studies in Advanced Hebrew (Modern and Biblical) and in the reading of Hebrew literature. This class will also facilitate the students' speaking skills. The class can be used toward a Hebrew minor or a major in Near Eastern studies with a concentration on Hebrew. 

 
Culture Courses (in English)

NE 2060: Israeli Film: Trend and Themes in Israeli Cinema
The course traces the development of Hebrew/Israeli cinema from the beginning of the 20th century through the start of the new millennium (the cinematic timetables given to students trace Hebrew/Israeli film from its inception to the present). The course presents directors and their representative films in documentaries and in mostly fictional dramas. The themes and trends studied in the course reflect the film development from pioneerism (a national and collective social orientation) to both personal and universal existential concerns. The film techniques, including camera movements, are studied reflecting the collective vs. individualistic approaches in Hebrew/Israeli film making. The themes covered in class  include: national idealism; settlement of the pioneers; the struggles for Independence; a  growing maturity about the senselessness of war;  siege with an awareness of loss and an understanding of the dangers involved in war; ethnic conflicts between Israelis coming from Moslem countries (Sepharadim) and those originating in Europe (Ashkenazim); criticism of the Israeli bureaucracy; the Arab in Israeli films; the effects of the Holocaust on survivors living in Israel (first and second generations); and a critical view on religious and nationalistic extremism. The objective of the course is to present Israeli film as it has developed from a local propagandistic medium to an artistic universal cinema. The class plans to attract students from the following departments and university programs: Near Eastern and Asian Studies, communication (film majors), the English-film program, Peace and Conflict, and Anthropology.  All other interested students are invited to attend. We will attempt to understand and interpret the content and form of Hebrew/Israeli films as products of a merging Middle Eastern society produced by the unique and artistic visions of most talented directors.

Please note that this class is also listed as a film elective and is part of the curriculum of the communication department. Students registered in communication will receive credits in that department. Those who are registered in Near East or Hebrew programs may take this class for a minor in Hebrew or a major in Near Eastern studies with a concentration in Hebrew.
 
NE 3225 Modern Israeli Society and Culture: a pluralistic perspective
The courses traces the establishment and development of Israeli society and culture from the end of the 19th century to the present. Included are topics on the 'Aliyoth' migrations, education and sciences, cultural life and social services. The course includes weekly lectures, videos, photo-biographies, and student discussions.  The objective of the course is to show Israel's pluralistic society: Jews of European and Arab backgrounds; Moslem/ Christian Arabs, the Bahais, Samaritans and Karaits. The lectures cover the following themes: history of the “Alyiot” from 1882- to the present; Israel – a Mediterranean nation; The Yemenites; The Kibbutz; Israeli Women in public life; Women are studying the Bible; Israeli government and minority groups; Dance and music; Press and Sciences; Education in Israel and the rise of the Israeli Arab intelligentia; Archaeology; and Poetry; First and Second Israeli Holocaust survivors; and the Israeli economy and demographic issues. The videos and tapes used in class facilitate and clearly illustrate either visually or audibly the course’s material. Supplemented up to date readings are distributed in almost every class session. Discussions are encouraged. This course counts toward a minor in Hebrew, an elective on a 300 level, and for a major in Near Eastern studies with a concentration in Hebrew.
 
NE 5240 Modern Hebrew Literature in English Translation
This course presents a survey of modern Hebrew literature in English translation from the end of the 19th century to the present. The purpose of this course is to present to students of all backgrounds a diverse literary experience relevant to our times. Students will be guided to analyze the literary texts: content and structure, and to develop skills and techniques of analysis and interpretations. The class is divided into three periods: European, Palestinian and Israeli. Major authors from each period will be read: Haim Nachman Bialik, Saul Tchernichovsky, Abraham Shlonsky; Nathan Alterman, Uri Zvi Greenberg, Lea Goldberg, Nathan Zach, Yehuda Amichai, Dan Pagis, Dalia Ravikovitch and others including novelist Aharon Appelfeld. The course comprises of lectures, discussions, recorded poetry readings and an interview with Applefeld.  This course meets the requirements of students minoring in Hebrew or majoring in Near Eastern Studies with a concentration in Hebrew. Students from the College of Liberal Arts and Science, and from other university programs are invited to attend. The class fulfills a minor in Hebrew, or a major in Near Eastern Studies with a concentration in Hebrew.

HEB/NE 3990 and 5990 (Directed Study)

These classes are offered in the Fall and Winter semesters, respectively. They are to be arranged between the students and the Professor. A work plan is proposed for each class depending on the student’s interest: Hebrew language, literature, Bible, or history. Please check your course catalogue for the maximum number of credits to be earned in these classes. They cannot be taken instead of regular listed courses, but as an addition to them. They can apply to a minor in Hebrew (beyond the minimum 20 credits required), or to a major in Near Eastern Studies with a concentration in Hebrew.

NE 6030 Poetry and Prose of Yehuda Amichai in English Translation

Reading and analysis of characteristics, themes and forms in the poetry of Yehuda Amichai from 1956 to the present.  Prose selections are also included featuring "Battle for the Hill," "The World in a Room," "The Bar Mitzva Party," "Terrible Spring," "Dicky's Death," and more.  Poetry readings and analysis are selected from: Now and in Other Days (1956); Two Hopes Away; (1960); Poems (1948-1962); Now in the Din Before the Silence (1963-1968); Not to Remember (1971); Behind All That Hides a Great Happiness (1974); and more.      

Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
906 West Warren 487 Manoogian
Detroit, MI 48202
Phone: (313) 577-3002
Fax: (313) 577-6243
Website: clasweb.clas.wayne.edu/languages
Email: aa1690@wayne.edu